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  #26  
Old 09-01-2011, 06:55 AM
der geile ami der geile ami is offline
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1200s have a lot of surface area to accept a spilled drink... plus, pitch faders go bad. whenever i do one-offs. i always try to have spares on hand.
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  #27  
Old 09-01-2011, 03:23 PM
georget georget is offline
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To to mention that the 1200 can't take a fall
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  #28  
Old 09-01-2011, 03:48 PM
wheresmejumper wheresmejumper is offline
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drinks shouldnt be near a deck.tough shit really if it happens.
a spare pitch fader,and maybe a tone arm assembly-that should see you through another 20 years easily
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  #29  
Old 09-01-2011, 03:56 PM
georget georget is offline
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Drinks are always around my decks. Luckily no spills. Does anyone here carry their 1200 in an ATA case with the platter on the spindle? Can this cause problems to the spindle? I know Technics recommends detaching the platter and carrying that separately. Well nobody I know does that.
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  #30  
Old 09-01-2011, 04:12 PM
wheresmejumper wheresmejumper is offline
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i thought that was only recommended so the platter wouldnt come off in transit and ruin the tone arm?
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  #31  
Old 09-01-2011, 04:55 PM
Digitalis Digitalis is offline
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I always take the platter off when transporting my 1200s. The platter can come off and damage to tonearm if the case is put upside down. The main bearing for the platter will also be damaged if the deck gets a hard bump while standing on it's side.

I made closed cell foam inserts to support the platter separately in my case and have never had a problem. I have even checked the decks as luggage several times without issue. On the other hand I have seen many decks destroyed in standard, foam over the platter, cases with relatively mild handling.
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  #32  
Old 09-01-2011, 05:21 PM
georget georget is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheresmejumper
i thought that was only recommended so the platter wouldnt come off in transit and ruin the tone arm?

Yes, but I do have cases that have foam that push down on the platter, so they do not move during transit.
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  #33  
Old 09-01-2011, 05:26 PM
der geile ami der geile ami is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheresmejumper
drinks shouldnt be near a deck.tough shit really if it happens.
a spare pitch fader,and maybe a tone arm assembly-that should see you through another 20 years easily

A brand new pitch fader waiting in a box wont help keep hte party going should something happen, like a guest toasting the dj over the console spilling a drink. Less likely with a beer, but very possible with shots of jäger.

Wasn't a turntable, but a mixer I had to service when such a toast resulted in an accident.

I'm not really worried about the supply of spares for hte future. Controller setups are getting more and more widespread
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  #34  
Old 09-01-2011, 05:40 PM
wheresmejumper wheresmejumper is offline
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i hope it wasnt a nice mixer!

jager....theyre the nights i barely remember lol
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  #35  
Old 09-01-2011, 05:54 PM
georget georget is offline
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Something like an Urei would survive a spilling like that. It must have been a Pioneer DJM something.
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  #36  
Old 09-01-2011, 05:56 PM
georget georget is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by der geile ami
A brand new pitch fader waiting in a box wont help keep hte party going should something happen, like a guest toasting the dj over the console spilling a drink. Less likely with a beer, but very possible with shots of jäger.

Wasn't a turntable, but a mixer I had to service when such a toast resulted in an accident.

I'm not really worried about the supply of spares for hte future. Controller setups are getting more and more widespread

I was at mainstream electronics store today and they had a MBP running virtual dj and some Numark controller. I was spinning at the store :> with the employees looking ar me...i did not like it though. It was harder to mix with that thing than with my technics 1200 and real mixer. If everyone moves to CDs and controllers, then there will be plenty of sl1200s for the rest of us.
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  #37  
Old 09-02-2011, 07:14 AM
Elliot Thompson Elliot Thompson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by der geile ami
1200s have a lot of surface area to accept a spilled drink... plus, pitch faders go bad. whenever i do one-offs. i always try to have spares on hand.

That type of wear and tare would vary on the user. The most expensive part of a turntable is the motor. If Technics had a tendency of their motor failing, I could understand buying a brand new turntable as a spare.

I’ve repaired many Turntables in the late 1990’s and, the main system wear was the RCA connects. There were a few loose components that required a little tightening with a glasses screwdriver, however nothing so expensive that it would be cheaper for the owner buy a new turntable.

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  #38  
Old 09-02-2011, 07:18 AM
Elliot Thompson Elliot Thompson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georget
To to mention that the 1200 can't take a fall

No Turntable will withstand fall without some type of physical damage.

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  #39  
Old 09-02-2011, 05:06 PM
der geile ami der geile ami is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georget
Something like an Urei would survive a spilling like that. It must have been a Pioneer DJM something.

xone:62

pre/post switch got clogged on one occasion, on another, i think it was the booth out knob which got compromised.

i wouldnt hold it against A&H, or any other manufacturer, including gemini. The products are not designed to be thrown in pools of corrosive fluid.

fwiw, ive had a newer urei come my way (the 4 channel with linear faders) where one of hte phono pre-amps sounded drastically different from the other 2, and the mixer had probably never seen a party in its life.
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  #40  
Old 09-02-2011, 05:08 PM
der geile ami der geile ami is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliot Thompson
That type of wear and tare would vary on the user. The most expensive part of a turntable is the motor. If Technics had a tendency of their motor failing, I could understand buying a brand new turntable as a spare.

I’ve repaired many Turntables in the late 1990’s and, the main system wear was the RCA connects. There were a few loose components that required a little tightening with a glasses screwdriver, however nothing so expensive that it would be cheaper for the owner buy a new turntable.

Best Regards,

my point is that the revenue loss from the bar should hte party end prematurely is much more of a loss than investing in a spare turntable which is never used. if cds were the dominant source in a particular club, id say the same, have a spare.
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  #41  
Old 09-02-2011, 05:22 PM
Reticuli Reticuli is offline
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The 1200 was discontinued for one reason: some tard at Panasonic didn't study in his basic managerial accounting class. Thus the tarded MBA holder looked at a profit margin on the 1200s as being smaller than some other thing they sold and even though it was reducing costs for the company and making *a* profit, it was discontinued anyway rather than just pricing it however a normal, sound business does in order to continue having a diverse product line and stay growing. You can probably trace it to one dope. The intangibles on this product -- the cred factor -- alone should have forced a re-evaluation of its discontinuance. What else has Panasonic got going for it? Flat screens? That's about it. And those will always be second to the classic Pioneers. It's not surprising. Hell, look at the situation Sony is in. Bad practices have become widespread in Japanese electonics companies. They have dumped so much money into stupid garbage rather than just making quality products. Sony's pretty much being held afloat by the PlayStation.
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  #42  
Old 09-03-2011, 06:15 AM
Elliot Thompson Elliot Thompson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by der geile ami
my point is that the revenue loss from the bar should hte party end prematurely is much more of a loss than investing in a spare turntable which is never used. if cds were the dominant source in a particular club, id say the same, have a spare.

A club owner or anyone who owns a large DJ sound system is not going to buy a brand new spare turntable for the sake of maybe using it. There are other components within the chain that are susceptible to damage as well.

Unless, the club owner sees a trend of a component constantly getting damaged by the DJs and/or malfunctioning it is not cost effective to buy backup components on every piece of equipment unless, he or she plans to rent them out.

Best Regards,
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  #43  
Old 09-03-2011, 07:54 AM
georget georget is offline
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I think that if one of your decks isn't working, you should have mix in you iPod as a backup.
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  #44  
Old 09-11-2011, 06:49 AM
Reticuli Reticuli is offline
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I wanna make one change to what I said about Torq's sound. Even though it sounds the most processed and has its own very distinct signature, I find it is also the most forgiving of poorly encoded or very low bit-rate encodings. Better tracks still sound superior, but will not sound as close to the original sound as, say, Traktor… or even Mixxx and VDJ. But Traktor, even with its superior sonics the others, is far more unforgiving of bad sounding tracks than Torq is. There's no up-sampling or interpolation or other sort of processing that Torq seems to be doing.

I still find Traktor to be the most difficult to configure with many controllers and has some serious oddities on the software concerning jogwheels and tempo changes when pitch bend is in use, people don’t have a problem with DVS turntables or dedicated, pre-mapped controllers. Torq has some quirks and defects, but is mostly passable in some configuration or another assuming you’ve got a fast enough system and aren’t getting drop outs. The copy protection stuff on Torq’s a bitch to deal with and has a tendency to disrupt other stuff on my computer, but it’s pretty easy to remove mostly.
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  #45  
Old 09-11-2011, 05:03 PM
boogieman boogieman is offline
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I see this thread is getting a bit off topic, morphing into another SL1200 discussion, so here goes in an attempt to get it back on track.

I now only use AIFF wherever possible and the newer Rane interfaces sound great. The original SL1 interface did sound a little dull, but most especially when playing compressed files; however, the SL1 is long since superceded and when playing genuinely uncompressed files (WAV/AIFF) with the SL1 it improves and sounds acceptable in comparison. If you're looking for a bargain and prefer AIFF/WAV, then a used SL1 can offer a basic and affordable solution. The SL3/SL4 are much better.

If you are interested in using HID mode on Pioneer 350/400/850/900/2000 units, then SSL wins hands down. Pioneer's recent ASIO driver does offer a very handy controller/audio option for Traktor Duo/Pro users not using Scratch Duo/Pro and very affordable in comparison. The sound is great; however, Traktor's implementation of HID with these players is woeful in comparison to SSL. This is where you really notice the finer differences in the products worth. The control of SSL via HID is precise and tight - Traktor HID is sloppy and latent, displays lesser information and feels 'unfinished'.

As far as the visual interface goes, SSL wins for me in terms of it's layout and logic. I own multiple Serato systems and multiple Traktor systems. Serato is a beautiful system to control and FAR more reliable.
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  #46  
Old 09-12-2011, 05:40 AM
Fred Bissnette Fred Bissnette is offline
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i wonder sometimes if all the technology we have to deal with just to play music gets in the way of just playing music
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  #47  
Old 09-12-2011, 02:14 PM
georget georget is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Bissnette
i wonder sometimes if all the technology we have to deal with just to play music gets in the way of just playing music

I like choices and innovation. It actually makes the job of the dj a lot easier. Remember the days of cutting acetates? No need for that today. When Final Scratch first came out in 2003, I jumped onboard and i was one the first carrying a laptop with music around. I could see the day that djs would be carrying laptops with Final Scratch to play on the 1200s. Well I got that one wrong. I see more djs playing CDs than DVS and I hardly see anyone playing wax unless they are doing an old school set. But technology has given us choices we did not have before. Now we cds, dvs, midi controllers, etc. It has made our lives easier and thar's OK in a way. I think technolgy gets in the way of our roots. I say, we should preserve djing using wax for the sake of preserving the dj culture, but we are already past that point.
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  #48  
Old 09-12-2011, 03:09 PM
Black Science Black Science is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliot Thompson
A club owner or anyone who owns a large DJ sound system is not going to buy a brand new spare turntable for the sake of maybe using it. There are other components within the chain that are susceptible to damage as well.

Unless, the club owner sees a trend of a component constantly getting damaged by the DJs and/or malfunctioning it is not cost effective to buy backup components on every piece of equipment unless, he or she plans to rent them out.

Best Regards,

Quote:
Originally Posted by georget
I think that if one of your decks isn't working, you should have mix in you iPod as a backup.

That's another beautiful thing about SSL in that if/when a deck should ever go down (either TT or CDJ), all you need to do is engage the instant doubles feature within the SSL GUI and carry on performing two virtual deck mixing using just one physical deck as a timecode controller. This wonderful feature has saved me a few of times over the years — usually when a stylus bites the dust in the middle of a heated mix.

Last edited by Black Science : 09-12-2011 at 03:12 PM.
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  #49  
Old 09-12-2011, 03:12 PM
der geile ami der geile ami is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliot Thompson
A club owner or anyone who owns a large DJ sound system is not going to buy a brand new spare turntable for the sake of maybe using it. There are other components within the chain that are susceptible to damage as well.

Unless, the club owner sees a trend of a component constantly getting damaged by the DJs and/or malfunctioning it is not cost effective to buy backup components on every piece of equipment unless, he or she plans to rent them out.

Best Regards,

you cant be serious. A turntable is a somewhat sensitive mechanical device operated by end users in an insecure environment. The investment of a few hundred bucks is laughable compared to everything else a club or large system owner has to pa for. One can get by running a system in mono, or losing a sub, but losing half of your sources is a party killer.

For concerts, providers routinely have a spare mixer sitting in the truck. PLenty of systems include backup processing. Every club I've worked for had more than 2 decks in the building. Plenty of hte lcubs ive worked for also have a spare mixer, should a live act need one (djm800 is the current favorite, even if system mixer is a a&h) or if main mixer goes down. Come to think of it, the better clubs ive worked for also had options to swap out amps should something happen, and reserve drivers, too. it is not a matter of having shitty gear, but providing unstoppable service to the patrons.
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  #50  
Old 09-12-2011, 03:15 PM
der geile ami der geile ami is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georget
I like choices and innovation. It actually makes the job of the dj a lot easier. Remember the days of cutting acetates? No need for that today. When Final Scratch first came out in 2003, I jumped onboard and i was one the first carrying a laptop with music around. I could see the day that djs would be carrying laptops with Final Scratch to play on the 1200s. Well I got that one wrong. I see more djs playing CDs than DVS and I hardly see anyone playing wax unless they are doing an old school set. But technology has given us choices we did not have before. Now we cds, dvs, midi controllers, etc. It has made our lives easier and thar's OK in a way. I think technolgy gets in the way of our roots. I say, we should preserve djing using wax for the sake of preserving the dj culture, but we are already past that point.

all depends on the market. in mine, for example, cds take a big back seat to dvs. there are even cheeky djs who chart time code vinyl
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