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  #1  
Old 12-20-2012, 05:59 PM
rs_ rs_ is offline
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2012-2013: Are Rotary Mixers getting more Popular?

It's a given that most of the world uses Pioneer DJM-800 or 900 mixers. Some EDM people use A&H but I bet that's 5-7% of club market share. The Rane SSL mixers probably have a large niche following with Mobile DJs and some hiphop installs.

That said, it seems like there's a lot more Rotary Mixers and Isolators coming out, and more DJ's I come across are aware of the existence of this stuff and they're not scared of using it, at all.

Unlike most Rotary users, I don't play much House Music or classic Disco at all. I use Serato, and I play very little real vinyl. I'm probably what you'd call a "Hipster DJ" who mixes Rap with Country with Italo with etc, etc... But, I love the feel and sound quality of a Rotary -- and most of all I love the unbeatable way a premium rotary blends two tracks. It sounds much, much better even with no per-channel EQ like on a Pioneer or whatever.

I find that people at gigs appreciate the sound quality too. They don't quite know how or why it sounds better, but I hear comments all the time that it does, even from people who don't know anything about sound systems.

I'd say that "superior sound quality" is a good way to distinguish oneself in a world where anybody with a laptop and pirated software can call themselves a "DJ".

Curious what other people's experiences about all this are...
rs
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  #2  
Old 12-21-2012, 05:48 AM
Elliot Thompson Elliot Thompson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rs_

That said, it seems like there's a lot more Rotary Mixers and Isolators coming out, and more DJ's I come across are aware of the existence of this stuff and they're not scared of using it, at all.

Unlike most Rotary users, I don't play much House Music or classic Disco at all. I use Serato, and I play very little real vinyl. I'm probably what you'd call a "Hipster DJ" who mixes Rap with Country with Italo with etc, etc...

rs



If indeed the popularity of a rotary mixer resurfaces again, it will more than likely be aimed to wards DJs that are trendier. You may recall a couple years ago nearly every company offered a rotary mixer, and discontinued them within a few years. It is quite obvious why manufactures stop offering them.

The harsh reality is the market is not large enough to maintain the consistency of a rotary mixer when the linear fader counterpart overshadows it. However, offering rotary mixers for a limited time will bring forth sales. This is due to DJs that are trendier, require a new piece of audio equipment to replace their older audio equipment every few years.


Best Regards,
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Elliot Thompson

Last edited by Elliot Thompson : 12-21-2012 at 10:17 AM.
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  #3  
Old 12-21-2012, 11:08 PM
Pete54 Pete54 is offline
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I think rotary mixers are still gaining in popularity, especially with the younger market (and i'm talking about proper rotaries, lets not confuse them with rotary versions of fader mixers like xone92, djm800, empath etc.)

And this year its been great to see a small market develop for portable desktop rotaries (Condesa, Discotheque n77). I can tell you that in Adelaide, Australia where Condesa is based, the owner has generated a lot of interest among the local DJs who probably never new about rotary mixers a few years ago.

It is also great to see brand new Buzzy Beck DLC rebuilds popping up on eBay every few months. I bought one earlier in the year and it is IMO the Rolls Royce of rotaries and something that I will hopefully never have to sell.

Now the challenge is to get more rotaries into nightclubs, and more touring DJs to request them on their rider. Maybe a big company like Rane need to make a large format desktop rotary with a built in isolator and a crossfader that sounds at least on par with the MP2016. And make it the same width of say, a xone92 so current booths won't need to be modified.
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  #4  
Old 12-22-2012, 01:00 PM
rs_ rs_ is offline
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I'm not thinking of mass-production DJ mixers that offer a rotary kit. I'm thinking of stuff on the build class of Urei, Bozak, etc... I'm thinking of the kind of stuff you buy, gig with for years, then pass on to your kids.

On a higher level I'm wondering if there might be an "effects backlash" in general, and DJs will start to focus on great sound and great tracks instead of noodling/beat-repeating/etc over everything.

I think that, sooner or later, the DJTechTools.com crowd is bound to realize that mutilating/mashing-up/cue-triggering every track isn't actually making the tracks any better. That would dictate a move away from 50 zillion effects and back towards simpler audiophile gear.

rs
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  #5  
Old 12-22-2012, 03:43 PM
1620_nz 1620_nz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rs_
I'm not thinking of mass-production DJ mixers that offer a rotary kit. I'm thinking of stuff on the build class of Urei, Bozak, etc... I'm thinking of the kind of stuff you buy, gig with for years, then pass on to your kids.

That would dictate a move away from 50 zillion effects and back towards simpler audiophile gear.

rs


The ARS-4100 seems to represent this pretty well. When I upgrade my Rane 2016 I'll be getting a ARS-4100 or a Bozak DLC.
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  #6  
Old 12-23-2012, 12:06 PM
Elliot Thompson Elliot Thompson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rs_
I'm not thinking of mass-production DJ mixers that offer a rotary kit. I'm thinking of stuff on the build class of Urei, Bozak, etc... I'm thinking of the kind of stuff you buy, gig with for years, then pass on to your kids.

So you are looking at it from a boutique perspective.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rs_
On a higher level I'm wondering if there might be an "effects backlash" in general, and DJs will start to focus on great sound and great tracks instead of noodling/beat-repeating/etc over everything.

I think that, sooner or later, the DJTechTools.com crowd is bound to realize that mutilating/mashing-up/cue-triggering every track isn't actually making the tracks any better. That would dictate a move away from 50 zillion effects and back towards simpler audiophile gear.

rs





Why should they? The nowadays DJ were not born when Turntables were the only means of spinning music to the masses using a Mixer without a cross fader. That’s like taking away an i7 computer from a 15-year old and, giving them a 486 DX-2 66 computer for their social networking. It could be used but why should they use it?

The majority of DJs today were born in a time where having lots of effects at his/her disposal is the standard. I am quite sure if they did not want to use the on-board effects, they would turn them off and follow the old fashioned method by means of mixing music.

I do understand where you are coming from as I have been in the sound system business for decades. However, I do see a generation gap lurking in the rafters which is why you may be having difficulty seeing things from the nowadays DJ’s perspective.

Best Regards,
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  #7  
Old 12-23-2012, 05:42 PM
Captainjr Captainjr is offline
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The rotary mixer was about the only thing available and used when I got involved and decided I wanted to pursue being a Disc Jockey. I have been around and involved in the industry since the late 60s and seen the many different trends in DJ tools and skills over the years. I still have my original Bozak D mixer as well as a DLC (occasionally serviced by Buzzy Beck) that to this day still functions as good as the day they were purchased. I am sure there are plenty of DJs out there that have original Urei or Bozak rotary mixers that are still going strong after all these years. A good quality rotary mixer will last you a lifetime with minimal maintenance if properly cared for. On the subject of being a good DJ…. all the toys and effects used nowadays do require talent and skill to know when and where to insert, add, or enhance the performance of a well planned out dance set. However it was a different talent the 70s or 80s DJs used and we were limited to more personal creativity and skills to mix, tape, edit, phase shift, backbeat, drop loop etc. Over the years many things have changed but the most successful DJs both then and now have the same thing in common and that is to know what tracks and popular mixes to play that appeal to your clientele and when not to over kill. I found that working in a club for 35 plus years and as a mobile DJ the most important one thing was to play the most popular recognized music to whatever group I was playing for. The atmosphere and environment also is important as to how far you can go with creativity or play straight forward tracks. A disco hit once said “let the music play” and a good DJ knows how far you can or can’t take it. I mainly do weddings and party’s now and playing the right tracks is more important than when I had to be creative and do all types of extra things to remain fresh and competitive. PS.....Happy Holidays to everyone!

Last edited by Captainjr : 12-23-2012 at 06:06 PM.
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  #8  
Old 12-25-2012, 02:34 PM
jnkarrik jnkarrik is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captainjr
The rotary mixer was about the only thing available and used when I got involved and decided I wanted to pursue being a Disc Jockey. I have been around and involved in the industry since the late 60s and seen the many different trends in DJ tools and skills over the years. I still have my original Bozak D mixer as well as a DLC (occasionally serviced by Buzzy Beck) that to this day still functions as good as the day they were purchased. I am sure there are plenty of DJs out there that have original Urei or Bozak rotary mixers that are still going strong after all these years. A good quality rotary mixer will last you a lifetime with minimal maintenance if properly cared for. On the subject of being a good DJ…. all the toys and effects used nowadays do require talent and skill to know when and where to insert, add, or enhance the performance of a well planned out dance set. However it was a different talent the 70s or 80s DJs used and we were limited to more personal creativity and skills to mix, tape, edit, phase shift, backbeat, drop loop etc. Over the years many things have changed but the most successful DJs both then and now have the same thing in common and that is to know what tracks and popular mixes to play that appeal to your clientele and when not to over kill. I found that working in a club for 35 plus years and as a mobile DJ the most important one thing was to play the most popular recognized music to whatever group I was playing for. The atmosphere and environment also is important as to how far you can go with creativity or play straight forward tracks. A disco hit once said “let the music play” and a good DJ knows how far you can or can’t take it. I mainly do weddings and party’s now and playing the right tracks is more important than when I had to be creative and do all types of extra things to remain fresh and competitive. PS.....Happy Holidays to everyone!

Very well said.
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  #9  
Old 12-27-2012, 11:44 AM
R_Dub R_Dub is offline
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"the most important one thing was to play the most popular recognized music to whatever group I was playing for"
well that philosophy works fine for a wedding DJ. but some of us
strive to do a lot more than that. just take example from the true greats like Larry Levan. Entertain and Educate your audience. It is possible to turn a head scratcher into an anthem. someone once said. playing all sing a longs is like putting up a white flag in your booth.
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  #10  
Old 12-27-2012, 06:18 PM
Richi Richi is offline
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Didn't Larry play some popular music and many a sing-a-long too amongst his other gems?
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  #11  
Old 12-28-2012, 10:26 AM
R_Dub R_Dub is offline
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yes. i was commenting on the philosophy of playing the most popular recognized music as being "the number one most important thing". It certainly wasn't for larry or any other great dj for that matter.
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  #12  
Old 01-05-2013, 02:17 PM
Reticuli Reticuli is offline
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Pioneer doesn't seem to the think so.

Screw Pioneer.
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